Canning Green Beans Is Easy Peasy

Today is green bean jarring day alongside of my regular office day. It’s my biggest task of the day but I have such great little helpers. They’ll be snapping and packing the beans in the jars. This is something they like to do and can do while a video is on. However, most of the time, I’ve found that they spend more time in conversation while getting a mound of green beans done.

Jarring green beans isn’t as complicated as it may seem. Although it does require a pressure canner, I like to cold pack mine. That simply means I’m taking the cold beans and packing them into the jars as opposed to hot packing (or heating) the beans first. So I take the beans and stuff them in hot jars that I’ve kept warm in my oven. The sanitize setting on your dishwasher will also keep them hot enough also. The object is to have the jars warm so you can add the boiling water to the jars and place them in your canner without them breaking.

After I’ve added the beans to the jar, I add about a teaspoon of sea salt to each jar. I place the jars in the oven for a bit while I’m preparing my canner and my boiling water. If you’re using the sanitizing setting on your dishwasher, you’d have to have your canner and boiling water ready prior to packing them. Then you’d simply add the salt (if you choose), add boiling water and place them in the pressure canner for the recommended time.

These are the basic instructions for how I prepare my green beans for jarring.  If you’d like to start preparing your pantry by jarring veggies, a great reference is The Blue Book Guide to Preserving. Our family has saved a lot of money putting away our veggies for the winter. It does take time but it’s well worth it in the long run.

 *A canning set can be purchased that includes funnels, tongs, a wand and other necessary utensils that make canning easier. Pressure cannershttp://rcm.amazon.com/e/cm?t=keeperso-20&o=1&p=8&l=bpl&asins=B00004S893&fc1=000000&IS2=1&lt1=_blank&m=amazon&lc1=0000FF&bc1=000000&bg1=FFFFFF&f=ifr are required for low acidic foods. A stainless steel pressure canner will last miles longer than one made from aluminum.

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